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HealthBiz

To create a successful wellness program, Grand Rapids-based Lacks Enterprises Inc. started by focusing on its corporate culture.

Holland-based office furniture manufacturer Trendway Corp. learned the hard way that financial incentives don’t always produce the desired wellness results.

Consumers Credit Union may be technically new to the wellness game, having just formalized its program in 2012, but it’s something that’s been an informal part of CEO Kit Snyder’s management philosophy over his 30 years at the helm of the Kalamazoo-based organization.

You don’t need to build an onsite gym or hire a full-time personal trainer to create a wellness plan that works for your small business.

When an employer fully funds its employees’ health plan — meaning that workers get the total cost of their health insurance and their wellness programming covered — the company has clearly made a choice to be well-invested in the health and well-being of its employees.

When Southwest Michigan First looked to create a robust wellness program, the economic development agency wanted to add a level of thoughtfulness to its programming rather than focus on avoiding unhealthy behaviors or diets and eliminating sedentary lifestyles.

Metro Health Corp.’s proposed joint venture with Community Health Systems Inc. puts a considerable amount of money on the table that ultimately will go somewhere to support a charitable mission.

Hospitals claim proposed reforms to Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance law that would impose caps on what they charge to treat people injured in vehicle crashes would cost them a projected $1.2 billion annually.

A West Michigan company plans to capitalize on pending federal regulations of dental waste to drive sales outside of its current Midwest market.

A trio of West Michigan hospitals plans to move quickly to take advantage of a pending rule change that would allow them to treat more heart patients who come to their facilities, rather than referring them elsewhere.

The $150,000 investment made in an East Lansing medical startup illustrates how a pre-seed capital fund created by the Michigan State Medical Society has started to adapt to the marketplace.

Eric Van Middendorp tapped a growing list of West Michigan-based health care, research and funding partners to develop a new medical device that secures patient breathing tubes. Through continued collaboration, the young inventor hopes to bring the product to market within the next two years.

After years of steadily rising rates for employee health coverage, small employers may finally get a little relief this year and next from the steep increases of the past.

Certificate-of-need regulations in Michigan help to contain health care costs, although they tend to concentrate some regulated medical services into the hands of fewer care providers, according to a new analysis by a business-labor coalition.

In offering cash rewards for members who shop around for the best price for their health care services, Priority Health says it wants to see greater cost transparency and even alter the industry’s trajectory.

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