Displaying items by tag: Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi

GRAND RAPIDS — A federal contracting firm owned by Waséyabek Development Co. LLC has begun work on a five-year, $161 million contract with the Department of Energy to provide site operations and support services at three National Energy Technology Laboratory locations. 

Published in Economic Development
Sunday, 12 April 2020 10:14

MiBiz Growth Report: April 12, 2020

This is the MiBiz growth report for April 12, 2020.

Published in Economic Development

Michigan’s 12 federally recognized Native American tribes have been awarded $4.5 million in block grants for affordable housing activities to protect the health and safety of their tribal citizens during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Published in Economic Development

Twelve Michigan-based Native American tribes will receive nearly $15 million in federal grants to support affordable housing for their communities. 

Published in Economic Development

Michigan officials are still months away from finalizing rules on internet gaming and sports betting, but some Michigan-based Native American tribes are taking early steps to participate in the newly legalized industry. 

Published in Economic Development

Native American tribes that want to participate in Michigan’s fledgling cannabis industry face many bureaucratic hurdles.

Published in Economic Development

GRAND RAPIDS — Tribally-owned Gun Lake Investments is making an active push into the West Michigan commercial real estate market with an investment in a high-profile redevelopment and three property acquisitions so far this year, MiBiz has learned. 

GRAND RAPIDS — The non-gaming arm of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi has acquired a downtown building for its headquarters as it looks to grow its federal contracting business, MiBiz has learned. 

June was a busy month for the Michigan Legislature.

Published in Economic Development

Across West Michigan, Native American tribes have started to hang out their own shingle in enterprises that move them away from the familiar tribal-owned casino.

Published in Economic Development
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