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GRAND RAPIDS — Like many West Michigan-based manufacturers, Wolverine Coil Spring Co. has adopted an all-hands-on-deck approach to counter industry stereotypes and address talent-attraction challenges. 

Michigan’s beleaguered K-12 public education system continues to take a beating from the state’s business groups.

As Millennials graduate from college and consider advanced degrees, West Michigan universities realize they need to integrate technology into course delivery and cater to a generation that grew up in the digital age.

The rise of big data and the need to interpret it to gain a competitive business advantage have led many executives to reassess their options for advanced degrees. While industry long considered the generalist Master of Business Administration as the standard for career advancement, more companies are prioritizing specialized graduate-level degrees in areas like analytics and data sciences.

A handful of West Michigan executives find that practical business experience can carry over from the boardroom to the classroom.

Michigan’s big three research universities kept up with their peers during the past decade in graduating talent, but lagged in commercializing innovations stemming from research.

Dan Brookhouse can’t stress enough to his control engineering students that automation is the future for the manufacturing industry. 

Today’s up-and-coming digital generation still sees the value of a degree-based management education, but a growing number prefer self-directed learning and just-in-time courses instead of established MBA programs, according to a new study.

Grand Valley State University’s search for a successor to President Tom Haas is the latest effort by a Michigan-based public university to secure a new leader.

Here's a list of articles in MiBiz's Higher Education focus section in the May 14, 2018 edition:

By focusing on an internal culture that favors employee retention and support for external training initiatives, some West Michigan executives say they’ve largely avoided any problems associated with labor shortages.

Tech center targets next generation

Written by | Sunday, 18 February 2018 19:46 |

Backed by $432,000 in new state funding, the Kent Career Tech Center aims to expose more students to career opportunities in the skilled trades.

Over the last few years, manufacturers have developed extensive in-house training programs in a move to combat skilled worker shortages.

Until business leaders can come together to address industry problems, companies “will not succeed.”

Giving up a Harvard University education to help develop a high-tech wearable device for elite athletes might sound crazy to some.

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