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For years, the MBA has been the advanced degree of choice for many executives in West Michigan and beyond, particularly as they look to climb the corporate ladder.  But the times and the needs of students have been changing in recent years. 

With the arrival of a new generation of workers comes a new set of personal and cultural values that employers must adapt to as they try to attract and retain the top talent. 

As West Michigan businesses have identified a need for increased professional development and management training in the workplace, many of them have strengthened their ties to local colleges and universities.

If developing, attracting and retaining talent remains key to future economic prosperity, then Michigan’s big three research universities say they’re clearly doing their part, at least on the front end of the equation.

MUSKEGON — High school graduates in Muskegon County will now have access to scholarship funds that will pay for two years of community college.

As lawmakers in Lansing discuss new energy legislation, Michigan finds itself at the center of a nationwide debate.

GRAND RAPIDS — A team of four Calvin College engineering program graduates are making waves with a product that’s a cross between a personal watercraft and a snowmobile.

As manufacturers struggle to find talent to staff the open engineering positions they have today, some executives are taking a long-term view by focusing on ways to fill the talent pipeline with more people in the years ahead.

The globalized workforce has reshaped how universities in West Michigan and beyond educate their engineering students.

Michigan’s big three research universities again compare favorably overall to their national peers in terms of innovation, although more progress needs to occur in getting those ideas from the lab to the marketplace.

Baker College plans to launch an online graduate degree this fall for nurses who want to continue their education and move into administrative or teaching positions.

Engineering and construction firms must prepare now to be able to handle the amount of work coming at some point in the future to repair Michigan’s crumbling roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

In launching a joint degree this fall in osteopathic medicine and business, Michigan State University seeks to produce better doctors.

The design process doesn’t have to be inclusive solely to designers. That’s the philosophy of Liz Sanders, a professor of design research at Ohio State University and founder of Make Tools. Sanders, who originally studied anthropology and who holds an advanced degree in experimental psychology, has spent her career encouraging designers to collaborate with end users and other disciplines to produce better products. Prior to her talk April 10 during the West Michigan Design Week, she spoke with MiBiz about her design philosophy, its impact on businesses and society and how design will be shaped in the future.

As dozens of comedians prepare to take the stage in Grand Rapids as part of the fifth-annual LaughFest comedy festival, corporate managers may find the performers’ interactions with the audience to be anything but funny business.

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