Nonprofits

SPONSORED BY GRAND RAPIDS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

In its two years in existence, The Job Post — a hiring and recruiting social enterprise of Guiding Light, a Grand Rapids-based nonprofit — has helped place more than 1,000 people into full-time jobs throughout the region, ensuring them more stability and a steady income. Vice President Elliott Groh spoke with MiBiz about growth plans ahead for The Job Post and how the program benefits the greater Grand Rapids area.

Small groups of women in communities across the U.S. have collectively given more than $1.3 billion to charitable organizations since the early 2000s.

LANSING — Major players in Michigan’s philanthropic sector have joined forces to raise $4 million to finance a three-year campaign to ensure each state resident is counted in the 2020 Census.

GRAND RAPIDS — People at or near retirement age are increasingly looking to create a next chapter in their lives that will give them opportunities to work and make meaningful contributions.

GRAND RAPIDS — Alan Breslau’s Grand Rapids-area home served as the initial world headquarters for The Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors Inc. when he founded it in 1977 to provide resources and support services to people like him.

LANSING — Funding for arts and culture in Michigan received a $1 million bump for 2018. 

GRAND RAPIDS — In the wake of a whistleblower lawsuit filed last month by its now-fired chief operating officer, the Grand Rapids Art Museum (GRAM) has to confront allegations that members of its executive leadership misused donor-restricted funds to cover gaps in its operational budget.

GRAND HAVEN — Foundations in Michigan are preparing to make financial investments designed to solve social issues while also increasing their asset funding pool.

HASTINGS — Kindergarteners in Barry County are getting a head start on saving for college or career training.

GRAND RAPIDS — Adding clarity to the definition of the word “charitable” as it applies to Michigan nonprofits could enable more organizations to claim tax-exempt status.

Philanthropic giving in a presidential election year typically remains stagnant.

Even as giving to educational causes slows nationally, two West Michigan universities remain hopeful that their capital campaigns will be successful.

GRAND RAPIDS — Based on the success of prior technology workshops, a local nonprofit plans to leverage its partnership with a Detroit-based training firm to support a bootcamp specifically for women.

GRAND RAPIDS — Advocates of the AmeriCorps program are concerned about its fate in the current national political environment.

Philanthropic leaders throughout Michigan are throwing their support behind state legislation to restore tax credits for taxpayers who make charitable donations to nonprofits.

LANSING — Farmers in Michigan are becoming increasingly dependent on guest workers to fill a void left by migrant laborers who are opting out of coming to the state to harvest crops.

GRAND RAPIDS — The growth of a fund established three years ago by a same-sex couple from Grand Rapids proves there’s interest in addressing issues the LGBT community faces in West Michigan.

GRAND RAPIDS — The proposal by a small contingent of Evangelical Christian churches to allow tax-exempt organizations to campaign on behalf of political candidates has sent shock waves through the nonprofit industry.

To date, nonprofit leaders have looked skeptically at the concept of compensating board members for their “volunteer” service.

The impact of possible budget cuts under the Trump administration is weighing on the minds of most nonprofit leaders in West Michigan, but it’s especially concerning for executives at arts and cultural organizations.

Business as usual has never really been business as usual for nonprofits. Each new presidential administration and the efforts to cultivate that next generation of donors leave very little room for complacency, especially in the financial arena. Keith Hopkins has made a successful career out of assisting nonprofits of all sizes with fundraising campaigns. MiBiz spoke with Hopkins about how nonprofits are dealing with the current environment and what that could mean for their fundraising activities.

Cultural arts groups in West Michigan are thankful for the current support they find in donors and audiences, but they have serious concerns for the future.

KALAMAZOO — As he focuses on preparations for the 2018 Irving S. Gilmore International Keyboard Festival, director Dan Gustin has a lot on his mind.

When corporations give to nonprofits, it can show up in many ways, whether on food pantry shelves or in employee-driven projects that improve lives in their communities.

When corporations give to nonprofits, it can show up in many ways, whether on food pantry shelves or in employee-driven projects that improve lives in their communities. But the decisions that go into determining the nonprofits and causes these businesses support often involves a high-level thought process that is increasingly seeking out long-term solutions where companies can drive successful outcomes.

Online giving continues to be the fastest-growing type of fundraising for nonprofits, but the dollars it brings in remain very low compared to more traditional methods.

Rumblings that the Trump administration plans to end the National Endowment for the Arts is cause for concern among many leaders at West Michigan cultural arts nonprofits. 

While for-profit businesses get the bulk of the credit for West Michigan’s economic success, the role that local nonprofits play in the community’s health, wealth and wellbeing often goes under-reported and unrecognized. 

Jobseekers in Michigan may want to consider careers in the nonprofit sector.

As a business owner and housing advocate in the Heartside neighborhood of Grand Rapids, Tami VandenBerg was devastated to see so many people there still living on the streets. 

In five years, The First Tee of West Michigan has grown from a $35,000 seed grant to a successful nonprofit with a budget just under $1 million. 

By the end of Blandford Nature Center’s $10.3 million capital campaign, the nonprofit will have tripled its capacity over the last three years.

Providing opportunities for youth in the urban core and helping under-employed adults to make economic and social progress has driven national acclaim for the West Michigan Center for the Arts and Technology.

Private developers say that working with numerous partners on a real estate project can often lead to complications. 

Cities with professional sports teams have an edge when trying to attract prospective visitors, but Grand Rapids continues to compete successfully without this added advantage.

Some might say Mike Goorhouse’s résumé reads like a dream. 

Amanda Winn had just graduated from the University of Michigan and was undergoing treatment for stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma when she thought of an idea to help other people in similar situations. 

Growing the region’s economy through sports-focused tourism has paid off for the West Michigan Sports Commission despite the less-than-perfect timing.

During a time when so many organizations are struggling to find talent, one Lansing-based nonprofit continues to offer jobs to people with disabilities. Since its founding in 1976, Peckham Inc. has operated under the premise that “people with disabilities are amazing workers but they often need some extra support around them to be successful,” said President and CEO Mitchell Tomlinson. Over the last two years, the organization has shifted some of its focus to providing training and opportunities for people with disabilities in the technology support field. Now, Peckham employs 150 people with disabilities in Grand Rapids working in I.T. help-desk positions and is in the process of hiring at least 30 more workers. Tomlinson spoke with MiBiz about Peckham’s decision to begin offering technology-support services and the opportunities those positions unlock for workers with disabilities. 

HOLLAND — Children who attend the Little Hawks Discovery Preschool often get an insider’s view of their environment simply by getting outside. 

HOLLAND — The impact of Kandu Inc.’s closure last year could have been far worse for adults with disabilities in Ottawa County were it not for the opening in October of the Hope Network Development Center.

BATTLE CREEK — Imagine preparing 100 meals and immediately tossing 40 of those into a garbage can.

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