Nonprofits

SPONSORED BY GRAND RAPIDS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Rumblings that the Trump administration plans to end the National Endowment for the Arts is cause for concern among many leaders at West Michigan cultural arts nonprofits. 

While for-profit businesses get the bulk of the credit for West Michigan’s economic success, the role that local nonprofits play in the community’s health, wealth and wellbeing often goes under-reported and unrecognized. 

Jobseekers in Michigan may want to consider careers in the nonprofit sector.

As a business owner and housing advocate in the Heartside neighborhood of Grand Rapids, Tami VandenBerg was devastated to see so many people there still living on the streets. 

In five years, The First Tee of West Michigan has grown from a $35,000 seed grant to a successful nonprofit with a budget just under $1 million. 

By the end of Blandford Nature Center’s $10.3 million capital campaign, the nonprofit will have tripled its capacity over the last three years.

Providing opportunities for youth in the urban core and helping under-employed adults to make economic and social progress has driven national acclaim for the West Michigan Center for the Arts and Technology.

Private developers say that working with numerous partners on a real estate project can often lead to complications. 

Cities with professional sports teams have an edge when trying to attract prospective visitors, but Grand Rapids continues to compete successfully without this added advantage.

Some might say Mike Goorhouse’s résumé reads like a dream. 

Amanda Winn had just graduated from the University of Michigan and was undergoing treatment for stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma when she thought of an idea to help other people in similar situations. 

Growing the region’s economy through sports-focused tourism has paid off for the West Michigan Sports Commission despite the less-than-perfect timing.

During a time when so many organizations are struggling to find talent, one Lansing-based nonprofit continues to offer jobs to people with disabilities. Since its founding in 1976, Peckham Inc. has operated under the premise that “people with disabilities are amazing workers but they often need some extra support around them to be successful,” said President and CEO Mitchell Tomlinson. Over the last two years, the organization has shifted some of its focus to providing training and opportunities for people with disabilities in the technology support field. Now, Peckham employs 150 people with disabilities in Grand Rapids working in I.T. help-desk positions and is in the process of hiring at least 30 more workers. Tomlinson spoke with MiBiz about Peckham’s decision to begin offering technology-support services and the opportunities those positions unlock for workers with disabilities. 

HOLLAND — Children who attend the Little Hawks Discovery Preschool often get an insider’s view of their environment simply by getting outside. 

HOLLAND — The impact of Kandu Inc.’s closure last year could have been far worse for adults with disabilities in Ottawa County were it not for the opening in October of the Hope Network Development Center.

BATTLE CREEK — Imagine preparing 100 meals and immediately tossing 40 of those into a garbage can.

As many nonprofits have started to prioritize succession planning, higher education institutions in Michigan are providing financial incentives to ensure those organizations have a pipeline of qualified leadership candidates.

When West Michigan Symphony Music Director Scott Speck visited Germany, he attended a free Bavarian State Opera performance. A crowd of at least 200,000 people greeted the orchestra musicians as though they were national heroes. 

KALAMAZOO — As nonprofits struggle to navigate changes in overtime regulations, they may be forced to slow the expansion of new programs and services and put a hold on staff increases.

KALAMAZOO — Of the hundreds of nonprofits in the Kalamazoo area, most of them have tapped into the services offered by ONEplace at one time or another.

GRAND RAPIDS — Two teams of nonprofits in Grand Rapids this year received grants from national organizations focused on racial disparity in health outcomes.

GRAND RAPIDS — The majority of people who serve on the boards of nonprofits lack the time to educate themselves about the terminology used in their organization’s financial statements.

recent course of events shows how the politics of Washington, D.C. can have a serious, direct impact on the work of local immigrant service providers.

Human-centered design is changing the way nonprofits across Grand Rapids approach complex problems.

Regardless of size or resources, nonprofits must keep cybersecurity top of mind. 

There was a time when the Grand Rapids Creative Youth Center only had access to its own data.

While a recent report shows that charitable giving is on the rise nationwide, the trend is far more complex on the local level in West Michigan.

Galas and golf outings may find themselves on the way out as nonprofits test the waters with more experiential activities to engage a larger audience.

Volunteers are becoming more valuable every year as fewer people offer their time and a growing share of the workforce brings otherwise costly skillsets to the nonprofits they serve.

Zoos and nature centers across West Michigan are constructing new facilities this year thanks to strong support from individual donors and contributions from foundations. 

When it comes to communicating with donors, Marcie Hillary stresses the importance of simply staying silent.

Bolstered by stable growth and strong support from government agencies, Michigan nonprofits look ahead to forging new partnerships to address the state’s unique set of challenges.

As one of the youngest sectors around, nonprofits are still learning how to balance competition and collaboration on all fronts.

When it comes to statewide budgeting, arts and cultural organizations often are considered a luxury and not a necessity.

GRAND RAPIDS — With development transforming the west side of Grand Rapids, organizations across the city are working together to combat the displacement of existing residents and protect affordable housing. 

Lifting what essentially proved to be a chokehold on charitable giving remains one of the primary policy issues that statewide nonprofit executives will focus on in 2016.

KALAMAZOO — When a violent tragedy struck downtown Kalamazoo in late February, local nonprofits reacted swiftly to channel corporate and individual donations to the appropriate needs. 

Last month, the fund announced that it had awarded $8.5 million, disbursed via 29 community foundations across Michigan. Of that money, just shy of $2 million landed in West Michigan, earmarked for initiatives that were outlined in each respective foundation’s grant proposal.

The Grand Rapids Community Foundation is fortifying an effort that allows nonprofit and for-profit organizations to tap into the institutional knowledge of retirement-age individuals.

Our LGBT Fund hit a milestone to close out 2015 when it announced its first grant of $20,000 to a collaborative program involving Arbor Circle and the Lesbian Gay Community Network of West Michigan (The Network).

A group of Grand Rapids women who pooled their funds to make a collective charitable donation last year hope to build off the success of their initial event and make more lasting impacts in the community.