Real Estate/Development

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GRAND RAPIDS — Commercial real estate brokers say the sale of two fully-leased, recently renovated office buildings in downtown Grand Rapids points to a healthy local economy, even if the transactions are far from the norm. 

KALAMAZOO — With a dearth of major buildings left to renovate in the downtown Kalamazoo area, developers say new construction will soon be their only option going forward. 

GRAND RAPIDS — As Kendall College of Art and Design finishes its first cohort of graduate architecture students, the school’s nascent program aims for significant growth in the coming years. 

GRAND RAPIDS — Realizing that a movie theater would not work as a standalone project in downtown Grand Rapids, J.D. Loeks knew that he needed to broaden the scope of his long-planned development.

Investments in rail infrastructure eventually will expedite the time it takes for Amtrak passengers to commute from Kalamazoo to Chicago, potentially cutting travel times by a half hour. 

GRAND RAPIDS — Offering shorter lease terms and increased flexibility to tenants may seem counterintuitive to executives in the office development and property management sector. 

Despite a global economic slowdown and fears of overheating in major markets, stakeholders in West Michigan’s commercial real estate industry say current regional indicators continue to show signs of a healthy market. 

Foreign investors have considered Michigan an attractive place put their capital to work in the post-recession years.

West Michigan contractors and architects point to the diversification of backlogged projects as further proof of a healthy regional economy. 

Most research firms project the commercial real estate market in West Michigan will maintain slow but steady growth in 2016. 

ADA — The future of the quaint village of Ada lies in creating a moderately dense, mixed-use downtown where residents and visitors alike can live, work, play and eat. 

A leaked internal document outlining potential plans for development in a Grand Rapids neighborhood has created a firestorm of controversy and stoked fears of gentrification.

Despite a number of recent global and national industry reports pointing to potential slowdowns in the construction sector, West Michigan contractors say they remain busy and confident for the foreseeable future. 

Michigan’s two leading construction trade groups find themselves on opposite sides of one key industry issue: prevailing wage. 

When developer Sam Cummings set out to redevelop a building at 25 Ionia St. SW in Grand Rapids nearly two decades ago, he needed to leverage the site’s historic designation to make the project economically feasible.

With nearly 2,000 new apartment units in the development pipeline for downtown Grand Rapids, many in the community have started to wonder when a full-service grocery store will open in the city core.

With more than 530 new apartments and at least $115 million in new investment, the pipeline for mixed-use development remains strong along the Michigan Street corridor east of the Medical Mile.

The West Grand neighborhood in Grand Rapids soon will offer residents and visitors the ultimate trifecta when it comes to craft alcoholic beverages.

From new high-rise office towers to revamped shopping malls to urban parks, the growing region continues to see new construction and major renovation projects across a host of real estate sectors. But a lot can go on between a formal project announcement and its actual completion — or even its groundbreaking.

With developers facing a series of complications in creating a sustainable housing market in downtown Muskegon, city government decided to take the rare move and jump into the business of commercial real estate development.

With state tax changes secured, Switch Communications Group LLC now turns its attention to the decade-long buildout of its $5 billion cloud-based data center in southern Kent County.

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