Talent

The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine wants to get medical students into the real world much sooner with the launch next month of an entirely new curriculum. 

Amid growing demand for health care talent, the partners behind a medical assistant apprenticeship program now look to expand the model to other in-demand areas. 

KALAMAZOO — Achieving two key accreditation milestones this summer shows that the Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine at Western Michigan University is meeting expectations.

BENTON HARBOR — The former president of Lake Michigan College claims she got fired last spring after just four months on the job because she found through an internal assessment that the school lacked compliance with federal rules for student aid.

The number of entrepreneur-themed programs developed for non-business students continues to grow across West Michigan liberal arts schools.

GRAND RAPIDS — The formation of a new support system to foster entrepreneurship in West Michigan severs what had been a direct link between higher education and the venture capital community. 

The $46.1 million Bronson Healthy Living Campus sprung from a need to create more room for Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s health programs.

BIG RAPIDS — Manufacturers often find themselves at an impasse when it comes to sourcing qualified welding talent. 

Despite losing one-third of its student body since 2012, Davenport University has embarked on a wave of spending, including expanded facilities, new dormitories and the addition of a football team this fall.

statewide analysis of the insurance industry’s $37.1 billion economic impact provides a basis to lure more players to Michigan, as well as highlights the need for training new talent to replace an aging workforce.

For years, the MBA has been the advanced degree of choice for many executives in West Michigan and beyond, particularly as they look to climb the corporate ladder.  But the times and the needs of students have been changing in recent years. 

With the arrival of a new generation of workers comes a new set of personal and cultural values that employers must adapt to as they try to attract and retain the top talent. 

As West Michigan businesses have identified a need for increased professional development and management training in the workplace, many of them have strengthened their ties to local colleges and universities.

If developing, attracting and retaining talent remains key to future economic prosperity, then Michigan’s big three research universities say they’re clearly doing their part, at least on the front end of the equation.

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