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Spectrum Health President and CEO Rick Breon expects West Michigan’s economy to stay strong in 2017, although the incoming Trump administration and the fate of the Affordable Care Act adds uncertainty to the year ahead for health care. Breon expects the new presidential administration “will, on some level, follow through on its campaign promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.” The big question is when and how that occurs.

Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services plans to pursue new partnerships around the state in 2017. CEO Mark Eastburg wants to create a network of hospitals and care providers that contract with the Grand Rapids-based Pine Rest to provide and manage their behavioral health care services. That strategy follows a model that Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital has used effectively to reach out from its home base. Pine Rest has 17 outpatient clinics — 15 in West Michigan and two in Iowa — plus inpatient and residential facilities. The nonprofit employs about 1,900 people and serves 45,000 clients annually.

Metro Health enters 2017 as a subsidiary of the University of Michigan Health System after the two closed on an affiliation agreement toward the end of 2016. The deal with the Ann Arbor-based U-M Health System gives Metro Health a partner to expand medical services ranging from primary care to specialties. It also allows Metro Health to better compete in the market. President and CEO Mike Faas told MiBiz he believes the deal is the biggest thing to happen in the local health care market since the 1997 merger of the former Butterworth Hospital and Blodgett Memorial Medical Center that created Spectrum Health, the largest care provider in the region.

After completing most of a $66.4 million renovation and expansion in 2016, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital looks to 2017 as a year to finish the project and to reach out further into new markets in Michigan. Mary Free Bed has five contracts with hospitals in Muskegon, Kalamazoo, Traverse City, Lansing and Pontiac to provide inpatient rehabilitative care. The Grand Rapids-based rehab hospital is “just thriving right now as an institution in every way you can measure” and presently is holding discussions with a half-dozen acute-care hospitals to join its care network, CEO Kent Riddle told MiBiz. 

No matter whether you love or hate the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, what’s become clear is that 2017 will bring major changes to the federal health care reform law.

From craft distilling to artisan food to retailing to niche publishing firms, West Michigan’s small business executives are genuinely upbeat as they look to 2017. 

Peter Skornia, the newly-appointed president of Grand Rapids-based construction and development firm Bazzani Building Co., hopes for a positive 2017. With favorable economic conditions for building and a new partnership aimed at further business development, Skornia expects the company to grow by expanding its workforce and via enhanced marketing. 

Neither the uncertainty of a new presidential administration nor possible interest rate hikes act as a deterrent for development, according to Rick DeKam. “It would take a much larger multiple percentage point increase to dramatically slow our economy, which is not in the Fed’s best interests,” said DeKam, the principal at Portage-based Midwest Realty Group LLC. He believes it’s “smooth sailing” heading into 2017, particularly because of low inventory across commercial real estate sectors in West Michigan and continued high demand. 

Municipalities and state and local units of government feel anxious for myriad reasons heading into the new year, according to Mark Nettleton, an attorney focused on municipal law, land use, zoning and real estate at Grand Rapids-based Mika Meyers PLC. With a new presidential administration, clients are unclear just what may be in store for 2017, according to Nettleton. The attorney thinks all manner of issues, from trade and tax policy to business incentives, could impact West Michigan’s municipalities. 

Orion Real Estate Solutions, the development arm of Grand Rapids-based general contractor Orion Construction Co. Inc., remains one of the most active developers in the market. The firm plans to open about 550 market-rate apartments in early 2017. Orion Real Estate President John Wheeler and Orion Construction President Roger Rehkopf spoke with MiBiz about their outlooks for the industry in 2017. 

2017 Outlook: Don Shoemaker, Franklin Partners

Written by | Sunday, 25 December 2016 16:35 |

In recent years, Franklin Partners LLC has been one of West Michigan’s most active developers when it comes to revitalizing under-utilized office and industrial space. Principal Don Shoemaker maintains a bullish outlook for 2017 as his company plans to seek heavy industrial tenants for the former General Motors stamping plant in Wyoming now known as the Site 36 Industrial Park. Franklin Partners also expects to finalize its decision in the first quarter about a redevelopment of the Display Pack site on North Monroe. Future uses there could include offices or residential — or a combination of both.

Anirban Basu thinks West Michigan’s real estate and construction industry has a pretty solid outlook for 2017. The chief economist for the Washington, D.C.-based Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC) views the region as having a strong job market and plentiful access to capital. Basu — who is also president and CEO of Baltimore-based economic consulting firm Sage Policy Group Inc. — spoke with MiBiz following his annual presentation in early December to the Western Michigan chapter of ABC. 

fairly new addition to the West Michigan commercial real estate scene, Grand Rapids-based Vision Real Estate Investment Inc. had a “banner year” in 2016. said President Tim Engen. With a mix of multi-tenant office buildings, industrial facilities and mixed-use residential properties within its portfolio, the firm made headlines in mid 2016 when it paid more than $31 million to acquire 99 Monroe, the fully-leased and renovated downtown Grand Rapids Class A office building. 

GRAND RAPIDS — If 2016 was the year of planning for myriad multi-family residential projects around West Michigan, 2017 seems to be the year for execution.

To say Aaron Zeigler is optimistic may be an understatement. Zeigler Auto Group recently topped $1 billion in annual revenue and expects to add another $50 million in revenue before the close of this year. By March, the organization hopes to finish construction on a motorsports dealership and “action park” — complete with a full restaurant, bar and several miles of test tracks — that will serve as a destination for enthusiasts, said Zeigler, the president of the dealership group. He projects growth by acquisition to continue to heat up in 2017. “We could add another three to four dealers next year pretty easily,” he said. Overall, Zeigler bets the economy will likely continue to grow, particularly if the incoming administration fulfills its promises to cut taxes. 

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